SCOTT M. BROUSSARD

108 MAIN STREET
RICHMOND, TEXAS 77469
Phone 281-762-1639

Fort Bend Divorce Lawyer, Scott Broussard

281-762-1639

Scott M. Broussard

Attorney at Law

Richmond Office
108 Main Street

Richmond, Texas 77469

Sugar Land Office
2299 Lone Star Drive
Sugar Land, Texas 77479

281-762-1639

281-762-1680

www.fortbend-divorce-lawyer.com

 

 
Denial of Visitation
The custodial parent may not deny the non-custodial party court-ordered possession / visitation as a result of non-custodial parent's failure to pay child support.  Such a denial of court-ordered possession may subject parent to court sanction. 
 
Best Interest of the Child
In making orders relating to the custody and support of children, the court will focus on the best interest of the child. This is the standard that will govern the judge's decision.
 
Fort Bend Divorce FAQ's
Get quick answers to frequently asked questions concerning your Fort Bend County Divorce / Family Law matter.  (Go to FAQ's)
 
DWI Information
An arrest for DWI does not mean you are a criminal, a drunk or a bad person.  Anthony R. Segura provides a thorough and creative defense to persons charged with intoxication offense.

www.dwi-houston-lawyer.com

www.fortbend-dwi-lawyer.com

 

 

 

FORT BEND DIVORCE LAWYER

CHILD SUPPORT

 

CHILD SUPPORT

The Texas Family Code includes very specific guidelines for the computing of child support requirements. The following guidelines are specifically designed to apply to situations in which the obligor's monthly net resources are $7,500.00 or less. In such cases, the court presumptively applies the following schedule:

1 child
2 children
3 children
4 children
5 children
6 or more children

20% of Obligor's Net Resources
25% of Obligor's Net Resources
30% of Obligor's Net Resources
35% of Obligor's Net Resources
40% of Obligor's Net Resources
Not less than 40%

If the Obligor has children from another relationship(s), the percentages listed above may be reduced.

If the obligor's net resources exceed $7,500.00 per month, the Court shall presumptively apply the above percentages to the first $7,500.00 of net resources. Without further reference to the percentage, the court may order additional amounts of child support. The court may not order the obligor to pay more child support than the presumptive amount (as calculated by multiplying the above applicable percentage times $7,500.00) or an amount equal to 100% of the proven needs of the child, whichever is greater.

Net resources is legally defined very broadly, and income can also be imputed to a party.

In addition to monthly child support payments, the payor is required to maintain the children on the payor's employment health insurance policy. If insurance is not available through the payor's employment, but is available through the payee's employment, the payor will be ordered to pay the premium costs. If insurance is not available through either parties' employment, the payor will be ordered to provide insurance coverage to the extent available and affordable. The cost of the medical insurance is a deduction against a payor's net resources. Additionally, the Court usually makes orders regarding the payment of deductibles and other uninsured expenses. All Orders dealing with child support must now be accompanied by an Order of Withholding. Medical Support Orders are now commonplace. The Withholding order, after presented to the payor's employer, has the Court-ordered child support deducted directly from the payor's paychecks.

The court may also elect to order the Payor to secure life insurance in order to cover the amount of child support that will become due until the child support obligation would terminate, which may extend to 18+ years.
Under the event of an absent marriage or other such acts which would emancipate the child, child support orders continue until the child reaches age 18. If the child is in high school at the age of 18, then child support continues until the time of high school graduation. If the child is in some way technically disabled, it may be possible to continue child support for an indefinite period of time. Texas law makes no such provisions for support during college, or the payment of any type of college expenses, however, this may be effected via contract between the concerned parties if an agreement can be reached regarding this issue.

 

         SCOTT M. BROUSSARD                  SUGAR LAND FAMILY ATTORNEY